At Last, Scrutiny for Public-Union Deals

By Matthew J. Brouillette, The Wall Street Journal

If you’ve ever spent hundreds on a smartphone or thousands on a new car, you know what it’s like to hunt for the best deal. Yet when paying for state and local government services worth billions, Americans often hand politicians a blank check without ever knowing if they could get more for their money.

Missouri Shows Growing Strength Of Right-To-Work Movement

Investor’s Business Daily

Is another union domino about to fall in America — this time in Missouri, where the Republican legislature has passed right-to-work bills in both chambers? It looks that way.

Is another union domino about to fall in America — this time in Missouri, where the Republican legislature has passed right-to-work bills in both chambers? It looks that way.

$15 Minimum Wage Will Hurt Workers

By Megan McArdle, Bloomberg View

So Los Angeles is raising its minimum wage to $15 an hour by 2020, and then indexes the wage to inflation, so that it will never fall below this level in real terms. The politicians who have passed this law are understandably very excited that many low-wage workers — perhaps almost half of the city’s labor force — will be getting raises, some from the current minimum of $9. I’m sure the workers themselves are pretty excited about having more money in their pockets. What’s less clear is what happens next.

Teacher Background Check Legislation Stalls

By Jordan Cuddemi, Valley News

Legislation that could provide school officials with more information about a prospective employee’s criminal record stalled in the New Hampshire Senate last week after the state’s top teachers union raised privacy concerns.

Put an end to prevailing wage

The Detroit News

The Legislature is on its way to repealing the state’s prevailing wage law. The measure artificially drives up the costs of public construction projects for schools and other government buildings. That’s bad for taxpayers, school districts and job seekers.

Yes, Right-to-Work Is Good for the Economy

By Paul Gessing & D. Dowd Muska, RealClearPolicy.com

Earlier this month, University of New Mexico sociologist Tamara Kay wrote a lengthy article largely devoted to attacking our organization and its research on right-to-work (RTW) laws. The piece is riddled with specious charges; here, we respond to the three most egregious ones.

Farm-labor case appears headed to Supreme Court

By Dave Kranz, agalert.com

A sweeping state appellate court decision, ruling part of the California Agricultural Labor Relations Act unconstitutional, sets the stage for an eventual state Supreme Court decision on the act’s mandatory mediation and conciliation provisions.