The Minimum Wage Struggle: Bootleggers and Baptists

By Adam Smith and Bruce Yandle, The Federalist

In recent weeks, minimum wage workers protesting their low-wage status have marched in the streets in more than 100 U.S. cities. For example, workers in Charleston SC blocked a main thoroughfare, insisting they be paid $15/hr and receive union membership.

GOP sharpens knives to cut political spending by labor

By Sean Higgins, The Washington Examiner

Federal labor law might be overhauled for the first time in 70 years if Republicans win control of the Senate in November, with key lawmakers planning to reintroduce legislation that would effectively cripple the ability of unions to raise political funds.

New ERA is a bill worth supporting

Colorado Springs Gazette

WHEN politicians come asking for your vote this fall, especially those seeking to serve or remain in Congress, ask them what they think of the ERA. It’s alive and well and gaining momentum.

Money in politics? Look for the union label

By Rick Berman, triblive.com

As the November elections get closer, voters in Pennsylvania will be bombarded with advertisements for candidates. Throw in issue advocacy advertisements and you’d be forgiven for wishing that political money would just evaporate.

Alexander, McConnell Propose NLRA Changes That Would Reshape Board and Its Processes

By Lawrence E. Dubé, Bloomberg BNA

A bill introduced Sept. 16 by Sen. Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.) and co-sponsored by Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) would enlarge the National Labor Relations Board from five to six members and make important changes in the board’s decision-making process as well as in litigation before the NLRB and the federal courts.

A Great Plan To Destroy Teen Jobs

By Stephen Moore and Joel Griffith, Forbes

The protesters hit the streets again this week in major cities camping in front of fast food stores and demanding a rise in the minimum wage. We don’t know how many of these agitators actually work at the minimum wage and how many are just community organizers, but the political pressure to raise the wage floor is being turned up.