UC Berkeley researchers miss the mark on minimum wage increases

By Michael Saltsman, The Sacramento Bee

Sacramento is the latest California city to consider a higher minimum wage, and proponents have cited studies from researchers affiliated with the University of California, Berkeley, suggesting a wage raise is mostly beneficial. This same team is expected to release results for Sacramento.

AFGE Tells VA Secretary Which VA Executives Managers to Fire: Huh?

By Bob Gilson, FedSmith.com

Last week, the Washington Post reported that the Secretary of the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) had, in essence, solicited a list of the executives and managers that the American Federation of Government Employees (AFGE), Local 17, (the union) thought should be fired. According to the article, Secretary Robert McDonald met with the union and told its representatives union he needed their help in identifying problem Executives and managers.

Court Upholds NLRB Union-Organizing Rule

By Melanie Trottman, The Wall Street Journal

A federal-district court has upheld a National Labor Relations Board rule that is expected to speed union-organizing elections, a blow to several business trade groups that sued to block it.

Supreme Court Agrees to Hear Challenge to Forced Public Employee Unionism

By Carl Horowitz, National Legal and Policy Center

When it comes to coercion, government employee unions are masters of the game. But soon they will be contending with masters of the courtroom. On June 30, the U.S. Supreme Court agreed to hear Friedrichs v. California Teachers Association (CTA), a case previously dismissed by a federal district and an appeals court.

Workplace Democracy Gets Ambushed

By Peter Schaumber, The Wall Street Journal

You may have heard of the National Labor Relations Board’s new “ambush election” rule—so-called because it hurriedly schedules union elections within as little as two weeks, depriving employers of the time needed to learn about the union and express their views to employees.

Raising the minimum wage is the perfect way to kill the summer job

By Jonah Goldberg, AEI.org

I had a lot of summer jobs. I was a foot messenger in New York for a couple of summers. I worked as a receptionist and mail-room flunky. Before my junior year of high school, I briefly sold ice-cream snacks — sort of yuppie bonbons — on the street for a company called Love Bites. The uniform was a tight red T-shirt (with a cupid over the heart), a straw hat, cane, and snug brown shorts. When my manager asked me to work weekend nights in the (famously gay) West Village, I defected to a company that sold Italian ices. First, I didn’t want to work nights. But at 16, I also wasn’t ready to say, “Hey mister, would you like a Love Bite?” to the gang leaving the Stonewall Inn.