Empowering individual workers rather than union bosses

By Rick Berman, The Washington Times

This week, Sen Orrin Hatch, Utah Republican, and Rep. Tom Price, Georgia Republican, introduced a new proposal to rebalance the rights and the law regarding employees and union bosses. The Employee Rights Act (ERA) is a package of widely supported reforms that will stop workplace abuses of both union and non-union employees by big labor unions. The ERA gives individual employees the power to control their own money, personal information, and choice for legal representation in the workplace.

AFGE Tells VA Secretary Which VA Executives Managers to Fire: Huh?

By Bob Gilson, FedSmith.com

Last week, the Washington Post reported that the Secretary of the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) had, in essence, solicited a list of the executives and managers that the American Federation of Government Employees (AFGE), Local 17, (the union) thought should be fired. According to the article, Secretary Robert McDonald met with the union and told its representatives union he needed their help in identifying problem Executives and managers.

Supreme Court Agrees to Hear Challenge to Forced Public Employee Unionism

By Carl Horowitz, National Legal and Policy Center

When it comes to coercion, government employee unions are masters of the game. But soon they will be contending with masters of the courtroom. On June 30, the U.S. Supreme Court agreed to hear Friedrichs v. California Teachers Association (CTA), a case previously dismissed by a federal district and an appeals court.

Workplace Democracy Gets Ambushed

By Peter Schaumber, The Wall Street Journal

You may have heard of the National Labor Relations Board’s new “ambush election” rule—so-called because it hurriedly schedules union elections within as little as two weeks, depriving employers of the time needed to learn about the union and express their views to employees.

Time to Enforce Texas Constitution’s Bar on Taxpayer Subsidies to Private Parties

Use of taxpayer funds should be reserved for purely public purposes, not the private benefit of an individual, corporation, or association. Yet, Texas public employee unions, which are officially private organizations, receive a direct subsidy from local governments in the form of release time, a practice that allows public employees to conduct union business during working hours without loss of pay.