The United Auto Workers on the Skids?

By Vincent Vernuccio, Capital Research Center

It’s been a long, slow slide for the United Auto Workers, which hit its peak in the early 1950s. Defeated in a critical unionization election in the South and facing a critical change in state law in its home base in Michigan, the UAW has responded to the challenge by raising dues and by staying the course on policy and leadership.

Boycott of Local Business by Union Member Backfires

By James Wigderson, MacIver Institute

Maria’s Pizzaria is not the likely location for a political fight. It’s a small restaurant on Milwaukee’s south side that hasn’t changed much in the over fifty years since its founding. The décor mostly consists of different cheap depictions of Jesus. Here and there are scattered a few pictures of the family. There is not a political sign to be found. The most prominent signs are those that say, “cash only.”

NLRB rules against Jimmy John’s franchisee

By Mike Hughlett, Star Tribune

The National Labor Relations Board has ruled that a Twin Cities Jimmy John’s franchisee violated the union organizing rights of six employees by firing them for publicly protesting the company’s lack of sick leave.

UAW says union membership near majority at VW Tennessee plant

By Bernie Woodall, Reuters

The United Auto Workers, which lost a controversial organizing vote in February at a Volkswagen AG plant in Chattanooga, Tennessee, has nearly enough members in its newly formed local for the automaker to recognize it as exclusive bargaining agent for the plant, a top union official said on Friday.