NLRB to Re-Visit Unionization of Temps . . . Again

JD Supra

For decades prior to 2000, the National Labor Relations Board (Board) consistently found that a bargaining unit was inappropriate when the union sought a unit consisting of employees of one employer together with employees of a separate employer, unless all of the employers involved consented. For example, a proposed unit consisting of employees of (i) a host company and (ii) a staffing company which provided additional labor to the host company was inappropriate for collective bargaining, absent consent of both employers.

NLRB Considers Combining Employees, Contract Labor in Bargaining Units

The National Law Review

The National Labor Relations Board (NLRB), via today’s announcement, is inviting interested parties to submit briefs on whether it should permit bargaining units comprised of both regular employees and temporary workers provided by a staffing agency. For the last decade the NLRB has consistently held that these two groups of employees should not be included together for purposes of collective bargaining.

A Better Way to Set Public Pay

By Thom Reilly, Governing

Fair pay is paramount for public agencies. Pay too little and good employees go elsewhere. Pay too much and budgets and taxpayers suffer, impacting the provision of effective and efficient government services.

State House panel to vote on collective-bargaining transparency bills

Pennsylvania Business Daily

Two bills designed to make union collective-bargaining negotiations more publicly transparent will be discussed and voted on by the House State Government Committee at a meeting to be convened by state Rep. Daryl Metcalfe (R-Dist. 12), the committee’s chairman, on Tuesday at 8 a.m. in Room G-50 of the Irvis Office Building.

NLRB Poised to Change Rule for Unionizing Temporary Workers

The National Law Review

Setting the stage for another likely change in Board law, the NLRB has granted review over a Regional Director’s dismissal of an election petition, where the Union sought to represent in the same bargaining unit a contractor’s own employees and temporary employees provided to the contractor by a staffing company.


Now that the California Assembly has approved AB 641, which would enable home-based childcare providers to unionize, a joint budget-writing committee will consider it, according to the Sacramento Bee. If approved, the resultant collective bargaining expansion would add thousands of child-care slots and trigger a rise in reimbursement rates.