Right-To-Work Ordinance Passed In Kentucky County Where GM Builds Corvettes

By Dion Rabouin, International Business Times

The Kentucky county where General Motors builds Corvettes has become the first in the state to approve a right-to-work ordinance. Warren County, which is home to the city of Bowling Green, approved the controversial ordinance that allows workers to opt-out of union dues and membership and mandates union membership not be a requirement for employment, the Park City Daily News reported.

Right-to-work law would protect Wisconsin workers

By James Sherk, Milwaukee-Wisconsin Journal Sentinel

Michael Romanchock recently got let go. But he was not “downsized.” His employer had no issues with his performance. Romanchock got fired for not paying dues to the Teamsters. His experience demonstrates how right-to-work would help Wisconsin’s workers and unemployed.

Frequently Asked Questions About Right-to-Work Laws

By Erin Shannon, Washington Policy Center

The issue of right-to-work (also called “workplace choice” or “workplace freedom”), the right of a person to hold a job without having to pay dues to a union, is steadily taking center stage across the country as states strive to improve their ability to create jobs, promote economic development and attract new businesses.

Misconceptions abound on ‘right to work’

By Paul Gessing, Watchdog.org

In the wake of the 2014 elections, New Mexico has a unique opportunity to enacted long-overdue economic reforms. The goal of those reforms must be to wean our struggling economy off of an increasingly unreliable Washington by developing a strong private sector.