Report questions spending of federal job training dollars

By Jason Cato, Triblive.com

A nonprofit spent more than $1 million in federal money intended for job training in Beaver, Greene and Washington counties on questionable expenses, including salaries and a work vehicle for its then-president, according to the initial findings of a state investigation released Friday.

PA lawmakers revive efforts to close union stalking loophole

By Andrew Staub, PA Independent

A federal jury convicted a once prominent Philadelphia union official of arson, racketeering conspiracy and extortion this week, providing more fuel for lawmakers who want to close a loophole protecting individuals from prosecution of some crimes if they’re part of a labor dispute.

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Union Exemptions from Criminal Law Must End

In 2012, a U.S. Chamber of Commerce report compiled a list of states that grant labor unions exemptions from criminal laws such as stalking, trespassing, and issuing threats. Unfortunately, in the subsequent years, the states in question have not been able to close the loopholes.

Pensions a middle-class crusher

By Stephen Moore, The Heritage Foundation

For “Outrageous Government Scam of 2014,” it’s hard to compete with the news of the supersized public employee pensions in California. If you haven’t already heard: In 2013, an assistant fire chief in Southern California collected a $983,319 pension. A police captain in Los Angeles received nearly $753,861.

NLRB holds that employer must continue to pay raises after CBA expires

lexology.com

It is well-established that an employer has an obligation to maintain the status quo after the expiration of a collective bargaining agreement. A recent case before an NLRB administrative law judge confirmed that an employer must continue wage increases after a contract has expired, unless language in the contract clearly provides otherwise.

Unions misuse members’ money for political gain

By David R. Osborne, The Mercury

If someone used your name on an election mailer to solicit votes for a candidate without your consent, you’d probably feel betrayed. But what if they sent that mailer to your spouse, lied about who you were voting for, and made you pay for it all — violating state law in the process?